January 19, 2018, 11:01:54 PM

Author Topic: low priced, but ubiquitious product  (Read 2846 times)

msellenk

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low priced, but ubiquitious product
« on: January 13, 2012, 05:37:14 PM »
Since I closed my yarn shop, I've been working on a few business plans; one is a physical product that just about everyone uses (handmade soaps, which I've made for years, but not specialized in). They sell in the $4 to $6 range. My concern is whether it is mathematically even possible to make a living doing it, because of the volume of individual customers needed (I don't want to wholesale, yet, if ever). The branding will be "handmade, natural, artisan", the product line is sufficiently developed that I don't have to do a lot of inventing, I just have to produce, package, market and sell. I know that I'll have to reach a TON of people to make the sales I need to be making. I guess I need to think of some other "soft" products that would align with this.

So the question I have is — can I make a living doing this?? A living, for me, would be clearing $28k for right now. Obviously, I have bigger plans down the road.

The branding for all my businesses is going to change from Pocket Meadow Farm to my name.

My etsy page is here: http://www.etsy.com/listing/86480257/naked-soap-castile-bars-for-felters-2


Joshuab

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Re: low priced, but ubiquitious product
« Reply #1 on: January 13, 2012, 06:08:36 PM »
You could blog about skin care and double your prices. Hand-made and artisan are markets that live of the story. Look into selling at fancy hair salons and massage places. Make it a luxury item.
Just some ideas...

Joshuab

msellenk

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Re: low priced, but ubiquitious product
« Reply #2 on: January 14, 2012, 02:52:46 PM »
Thanks! This particular product is one of the lower priced ones, but the max you can get anywhere I've seen is $6/bar. So yeah, with sales at those numbers I need to go beyond just sales of the product.

r00tbeer

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Re: low priced, but ubiquitious product
« Reply #3 on: January 17, 2012, 08:02:06 PM »
Maybe once you ramp up some site visitors you could sell an ebook explaining how you make the soap... in case someone wants to try.

msellenk

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Re: low priced, but ubiquitious product
« Reply #4 on: January 17, 2012, 11:10:14 PM »
Thanks, yes. I had sort of ruled that out because there are a half dozen out there already, but I'm going to revisit the idea (thanks for the push). I would cover information that other people have not, and have more specific information about recipes and safety. Hardly anyone covers that properly, in my opinion.

r00tbeer

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Re: low priced, but ubiquitious product
« Reply #5 on: January 18, 2012, 09:55:10 AM »
Perhaps you could also explain "wet Nuno felting" which I saw on your soap link.... I had to google that one!  Very unusual phrase.

msellenk

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Re: low priced, but ubiquitious product
« Reply #6 on: January 18, 2012, 10:12:42 AM »
LOL, good idea :)

rudyk

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Re: low priced, but ubiquitious product
« Reply #7 on: January 18, 2012, 03:55:26 PM »
Thanks, yes. I had sort of ruled that out because there are a half dozen out there already, but I'm going to revisit the idea (thanks for the push). I would cover information that other people have not, and have more specific information about recipes and safety. Hardly anyone covers that properly, in my opinion.

The people that like your soaps will want to learn from YOU, not from someone else.  So who cares how many other options are out there?  How many cookbooks are out there, yet there's more being published every day.  There's a reason for that.

You're building a 'Tribe' of people that love your soap, and love what you do, and like you because you're you.

So give them what they want ... more of you.  For those true fans, paying for it isn't a big deal.  Give away good stuff, sell good stuff.

But never ever ever forget ... these folks read your site and buy your soap because of YOU.  And they will buy your book just because it's yours.  So ignore the competition, cater to your fans, and you'll make money.

Good old Zig Ziglar has a quote that's relevant here:

“You can have everything in life that you want if you just give enough other people what they want.”

Think about that one...
My main blog is Preparing Your Family

msellenk

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Re: low priced, but ubiquitious product
« Reply #8 on: January 18, 2012, 04:48:19 PM »
WOW! That is EXCELLENT ADVICE. 100% correct. I tend to think why the heck should I "write another cookbook" etc. when there are a zillion, but you are sooooo right. THANKS!! :)

mxitman

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Re: low priced, but ubiquitious product
« Reply #9 on: January 19, 2012, 11:38:43 AM »
I would also recommend to try selling through some beauty/hair salons...specially if it's one you frequent...or start frequenting now since most places like that don't like soliciting. You can start with free samples at the checkout with a small POP/POS (Point of Purchase/Sale) be sure to entice the customer with free samples/heavy discounts on your website if they use the special promo code on the free sample.

I would also look into building a automatic delivery (Subscription Service) Using a different soap each month, or something along those lines. I have a friend who sells syrups and that's what he did and after breaking even the first year he is doing pretty well now. The soap market is pretty competitve allot of ones out there, but along with farmers markets and soliciting your favorite grocery store that's the way to go IMO...good luck
HVAC/R Mechanic, Stay At Home Dad Trying To Get Some Of My Ideas Flowing.

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ag2

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Re: low priced, but ubiquitious product
« Reply #10 on: March 19, 2012, 03:15:25 PM »
Heck yes!  You can make a living at this. 

You might enjoy watching this episode of Shark Tank.  This lady has a soap business that the VCs liked so much, they started bidding against each other to have a piece of her business.
http://abc.go.com/shows/shark-tank/video-detail/shark-tank-moments/you-smell/pl_PL5539773/vd_VD55167884
This link is just the teaser.  You must watch the full episiode!  Listen to their price points.  Watch the full episode.

I have to agree with some of the other posts.  Connect with your customers.  This is especially important in the repeat business.  Build that loyalty.

Here's another idea if you are looking for ideas.  Learn about eczema.  Perhaps you can market to folks with certain skin conditions.  My kids and my niece had/have eczema.  But I know some people who don't outgrow it.  If you can find relief for these folks, you will have another niche.

Also, seek out shops like this one.  Laser and skin care shops.  Many, perhaps most, are locally owned and they would also like to support small, independent owners.  http://www.essentiallybareclinic.com/

msellenk

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Re: low priced, but ubiquitious product
« Reply #11 on: March 19, 2012, 06:04:11 PM »
Thanks for those links!